Share

Why you should click a picture?

The increasing number of photographers in the day seems to brew a solitary question in one’s mind. Why are there so many evangelic men and women who crave the extra weight of their very own personal black box, while they’re out doing seemingly ordinary things? They have their camera and all its brothers and sisters, staking out in their sling bag, waiting for something to happen, something worth the moment. The moment. That’s what they’re calling it these days. “Oh it’s all about getting the right moment.” “You need to be attentive. You could be miss the moment!” Yes, because that would be a true shame. I’ve seen my share of sad, moping photographers who crib about living the moment instead of capturing it in their precious magic box. I’ll give you a second to comprehend the irony in that statement.

But I understand them, completely, for I am one of them. Yes, I’m a proud, neurotic, obsessive compulsive photographer. And I am here to maybe explain the inner workings of the photographer species and try to decipher why a picture is clicked. And I’m here to convince you to do the same and become one of us too. *One. Of. Us*

Why do we click pictures? You can go ahead and picture me grimacing right about now. Hmmm. Well it sure as hell isn’t so we can click potential profile pictures for all our friends who will not ever ask to click you, ever. Although, if you have no friends, this is a very good place to start. Buy a DSLR and offer to click people, and magically you have way more friends than you can count. And expect just as many inbox messages asking you to “please send over the pictures, if it’s not a problem, please, thanks”. Oh it’s a good life, I assure you.

But a picture is much more than that. First you need to select a subject. That’s the beauty of it, really. You get to pick out anything at all in the Universe and make it the protagonist of your story. You can condense a bundle of emotions in your heart and then objectify it into something that you see. You can dote it with the flavour of colors, embed with meaning that you create in your mind.

And then there’s the perspective consideration, which itself is a lesson to life. Just like a given situation in life, a picture can be perceived from various view points. You can choose to refocus on a few things while blurring the rest, you can put everything into the frame or you can conveniently leave things out. That’s an objectified take on what you need to do in life. There are a hundred million perspectives to a scenario. Fifty million of them are negative, stressful, boring, and hopeless. Fifty million of them are inspiring, brave, funny, beautiful and just plainly happy. You get to choose. Your choice makes the path.

That’s what the photographer does. He tries to capture his purpose, his emotion, the colors of his soul, the meaning of his life into one rectangular image. He does try to capture a moment, you see.
He wants to capture and store and relive that moment… in which he truly lived.


Leave a Comment